Current SPUR Mentors

All SPUR mentors have active research labs at graduate or undergraduate institutions. You can click each mentor’s name in the columns below to learn more about his/her research. To email a mentor, please click his/her name in the column, then click his/her name again above the “About My Research” section.

 

Elliot Berkman, University of Oregon
Frank Bernieri, Oregon State University
Monica Biernat, University of Kansas
Eliza Bliss-Moreau, University of California, Davis
Ginette Blackhart, East Tennessee State University
Caroline Blais, Université du Québec en Outaouais
Kirk Warren Brown, PhD, Virginia Commonwealth University
Amy Brunell, Ohio State University at Mansfield
Jeni Burnette, North Carolina State University
Cheryl Carmichael, Brooklyn College, CUNY
Bettina Casad, University of Missouri-St. Louis
Joseph Cesario, Michigan State University
Sapna Cheryan, University of Washington
Shana Cole, Rutgers University
Nancy Collins, University of California, Santa Barbara
Maureen Craig, New York University
Chris Crandall, University of Kansas
Travis Crone, University of Houston-Downtown
Amber DeBono, Winston-Salem State University
Sally Farley, University of Baltimore
Jennifer Fugate, University of MA – Dartmouth
Shelly Gable, University of California, Santa Barbara
Amber M. Gaffney, Humboldt State University
Sarah Gaither, Duke University
Wendi Gardner, Northwestern University
Jessica Good, Davidson College
Kurt Gray, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Igor Grossmann, University of Waterloo
Nao Hagiwara, Virginia Commonwealth University
Gabriella Harari, Stanford University
Larisa Heiphetz, Columbia University
Erin Hennes, Purdue University
Hal HershfieldUCLA Anderson School of Management
Edward Hirt, Indiana University
Simon Howard, Marquette University
Derek Isaacowitz, Northeastern University
Rachael Jack, Institution of Neuroscience & Psychology, University of Glasgow, UK 
Jeremy Jamieson, University of Rochester
Lisa Jaremka, University of Delaware
Peter Jonason, Western Sydney University
Cheryl Kaiser, University of Washington
Lucas Keefer, University of Southern Mississippi
Laura King, University of Missouri, Columbia
Sara Konrath,  Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis
Kevin Ladd, Indiana University South Bend
Veronica Lamarche, University of Essex
Bernhard Leidner, University of Massachusetts
Dana Leighton, Texas A&M University—Texarkana
Christopher Leone, University of North Florida
Kristen Lindquist, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Debbie Ma, California State University Northridge
Christine Ma-Kellams, University of La Verne

Cara MacInnis, University of Calgary
Keith Maddox, Tufts University
Wendy Berry Mendes, UC San Francisco
Monica Miller, University of Nevada, Reno
Marina Milyavskaya, Carleton University
Matt Motyl, University of Illinois at Chicago
Damian Murray, Tulane University
Keely Muscatell, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Jean Natividade, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro
Yolanda NiemannUniversity of North Texas
Jessica Nolan, University of Scranton
Kymberlee M. O’Brien, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Kristina Olson, University of Washington
Christopher Oveis, UC San Diego
John Pachankis, Yale University
Sylvia Perry, Northwestern University
Cynthia Pickett, University of California, Davis
Angela Pirlott, Saint Xavier University
Kimberly Quinn, DePaul University
Jessica Remedios, Tufts University
Lindsey Rodriguez, University of South Florida - St. Petersburg
Nick Rule, University of Toronto
Brian Sanchez, UC Riverside
Joni Sasaki, University of Hawaii
Donald Saucier, Kansas State University
Benjamin Saunders, Long Island University - Brooklyn
Toni Schmader, UBC
Juliana Schroeder, UC Berkeley
Marlene Schwartz, University of Connecticut
Amanda Sesko, University of Alaska Southeast
Sawa Senzaki, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
Jeffrey Sherman, University of California, Davis
Donna Shestowsky, UC Davis School of Law
Natalie Shook, West Virginia University
H. Colleen Sinclair, Mississippi State University
Samuel Sommers, Tufts University
Stephanie Spielmann, Wayne State University
Janina Steinmetz, Utrecht University
Chadly Stern, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Margaret Stevenson, University of Evansville
John Tawa, Mount Holyoke College
Jo-Ann Tsang, Baylor University
Jay Van Bavel, New York University
Greg Walton, Stanford University
Christian Waugh, Wake Forest University
Oliver WilhelmUlm University
Anne WilsonWilfrid Laurier University
Thiyagarajan Yuvaraj, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli, India
Jamil Zaki, Stanford University
Michael Zarate, UT El Paso
Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Oakland University

 


Elliot Berkman, University of Oregon
About My Research: The Social and Affective Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Oregon studies the motivation and cognitive factors underlying self-regulation. Our methods include functional neuroimaging, laboratory experiments, and longitudinal experience sampling and intervention approaches. Ultimately, our research aims to identify effective new pathways for health behavior change. The University of Oregon, its Department of Psychology, and the Social and Affective Neuroscience Laboratory are committed to increasing diversity and inclusiveness in research and teaching. We were thrilled to read about this program and are excited to be a part of it!
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Frank Bernieri, Oregon State University
About My Research: We analyze the nonverbal behavior in face-to-face interactions and examine issues of first impression accuracy, the impact of trait empathy on rapport, and the predictive utility of specific behavior patterns on various social/relationship outcomes. see lab webpage: http://liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/school-psychological-science/isl
Additional Information: I've been a past mentor in NSF's REU program (Research Experiences for Undergraduates).
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Monica Biernat, University of Kansas
About My Research: We study how stereotypes affect judgments of individual group members; e.g., how race and gender matter for social judgment, particularly in academic and work settings. We highlight the use of stereotypes as judgment standards, and the role of communication in promoting and disrupting stereotype use. The University of Kansas has a great group of Social Psychology faculty and graduate students, and opportunities would be available for cross-lab interactions.
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Ginette Blackhart, East Tennessee State University
About My Research: Broadly, I study the interaction between the self and/or individual difference factors and social factors on mental and physical health. My current primary interest is examining factors that impact self-regulatory resources and self-control. I also conduct research examining predictors of online dating and responses to various forms of social rejection.
Additional Information: The Self & Relationships lab at ETSU is an active research laboratory with 8-10 undergraduate research assistants and 2 PhD level graduate students. ETSU has a PhD program in Psychology with concentrations in Clinical Psychology and in Experimental Psychology.
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Caroline Blais, Université du Québec en Outaouais
About My Research: My research is at the interface of vision and social psychology. I study how different sociocultural factors influence visual processes. For instance, how culture affects the visual processes involved in face, object, and scene processing; how racism affects the decoding of facial expression of emotions.
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Eliza Bliss-Moreau, University of California, Davis
About My Research: My laboratory explores questions related to the development and evolution of affect and emotion in a social context. We conduct both translational and comparative science by studying both nonhuman primates and humans. We are particularly interested in how individuals' social roles within their social networks relate to affective reactivity. My laboratory is based at the California National Primate Research Center at UC Davis. As a result, students who join the laboratory will need to undergo a background check, fairly extensive screening, and show proof of measles immunity (vaccine or titre) and be TB free. elizablissmoreau.com
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Kirk Warren Brown, PhD, Virginia Commonwealth University
About My Research: My research program focuses on the self- and emotion-regulatory consequences of mindfulness. My graduate and undergraduate students and I conduct mindfulness-based and mindfulness-integrated experiments and training trials with both adults and adolescents using first-person, ecological momentary assessment, and brain imaging (EEG, fMRI) methods. My Social and Affective Neuroscience Lab website: www.kirkwarrenbrown.vcu.edu
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Amy Brunell, Ohio State University at Mansfield
About My Research: Broadly, the focus of my research is on self processes and social contexts. I have primarily focused on investigating narcissism as a lens for understanding behavior, such as risk-taking and moral/ethical behavior (e.g., cheating). My second line of research investigates dating relationships. Ohio State University at Mansfield is a regional campus of Ohio State University and is located about 60 miles northeast of Columbus, Ohio. OSU Mansfield is primarily an undergraduate institution; faculty are expected to have active programs of research.
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Jeni Burnette, North Carolina State University
About My Research: Dr. Burnette primarily studies how growth mindsets (believing attributes can change) help to reduce the negative implications of competing drives and stigma for self-regulation in domains relevant for physical and psychological well-being. She explores these issues using diverse research designs, ranging from interventions to basic experimental methods to longitudinal surveys.
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Cheryl Carmichael, Brooklyn College, CUNY
About My Research: I study close relationships, health, and the social regulation of emotions. In my lab, we use experimental and daily diary approaches to examine how verbal (e.g., sharing good news, providing social support) and nonverbal (e.g., touch) relationship behavior promotes perceived responsiveness, relationship quality, emotional well-being, and physical health in face to face and mediated interactions.
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Bettina Casad, University of Missouri-St. Louis
About My Research: The Social Psychology and Neuroscience Research Lab at the University of Missouri-St. Louis encompasses several research projects that tackle interdisciplinary research questions in the fields of social psychology, social neuroscience, and organizational psychology. Projects examine mechanisms of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination for both targets and perceivers. Current projects investigate effects of threatening environments on underrepresented groups, self-regulation mechanisms in response to threat, perceptions of targets and allies who confront prejudice, and effects of social media and racism on stress. Projects implement multiple measures including self-report, implicit, non-verbal, behavioral, physiological measures (blood pressure, heart rate variability, impedance cardiography, facial EMG), EEG, and neuroendocrine markers (cortisol, DHEA, IL-6).
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Joseph Cesario, Michigan State University
About My Research: We study cognitive modeling of decision-making and how various factors (e.g., race, SES) impact the decision process. Currently studying race bias in the decision to shoot using an immersive shooting simulator in our lab and collecting data with law enforcement. See http://www.cesariolab.com/research for more information.
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Sapna Cheryan, University of Washington
About My Research: We examine how cultural stereotypes impact choices, behaviors, and sense of belonging. Our two current main lines of work investigate 1) how stereotypes of STEM fields influence gender disparities, and 2) how to broaden our understanding of racial dynamics to incorporate the experience of recent immigrant groups. We have an active lab in the summer, including running participants, lab meetings, and tutorials. For more information about our lab, visit our lab web page at: http://depts.washington.edu/sibl/.
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Shana Cole, Rutgers University
About My Research: How do people overcome obstacles and difficulties in order to successfully meet the goals they set? The RAMP Lab explores the social cognitive and perceptual processes that predict and promote effective goal pursuit. Our exploration cuts across multiple domains, including dieting, relationships, exercise, race, and gender.
Additional Information: Research Assistants will have an opportunity to participate in the research experience in many different capacities, including: attending lab meetings where new ideas are developed and ongoing research is discussed, contributing to the design and implementation of study materials, helping with data entry and analysis, and most importantly, spending time in the lab and in the field conducting experiments. RAMP Lab website: www.ramplab-rutgers.com
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Nancy Collins, University of California, Santa Barbara
About My Research: My work focuses on the mechanisms through which romantic couples seek and provide social support. Using experimental and observational methods, we study empathy (feelings of empathic concern for one's partner and empathic accuracy or "mind-reading"), self-disclosure, and emotional expression in the context of social support interactions. I would love to work with interested students this summer!
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Maureen Craig, New York University
About My Research: The DaSP Lab investigates intergroup relations and cognition from dual perspectives: those of stigmatized groups as well as majority groups. We explore how individuals respond to, and the implications of, diversity in relation to individuals’ social and political attitudes as well as basic social cognitive processes underlying these attitudes.
Additional Information: More details can be found on our website: https://wp.nyu.edu/craiglab/
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Chris Crandall, University of Kansas
About My Research: Our lab focuses on the cognitive processes that influence the expression of beliefs, attitudes, and values. We study how biases in normal cognitive functioning lead to political ideology, how we can harbor prejudice but still feel moral, and how the love of hierarchy can slip into our egalitarian souls. The Social Psychology program at the University of Kansas is extremely collaborative. Students work with several faculty members, faculty work with each other, and students collaborate with students. We provide a non-competitive opportunity to learn, discuss, debate, and excel. Students would have an opportunity to interact with faculty whose interests include stereotyping, metaphor and thought, intergroup relations, personal relationships, attachment, social influence and energy consumption, social judgment, inequality, and much more. Students would become part of a research and support network.
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Travis Crone, University of Houston-Downtown
About My Research: I explore nonconscious priming in several ways. I am currently researching power and embodied cognition, religious priming and belief, morality, and the underlying cognitive mechanisms of nonconscious goal priming. During the academic year, I also explore the effect of teaching styles on student performance and other outcomes. Students working with me can expect to get in the lab experience as well as out of the lab data collection experience.
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Amber DeBono, Winston-Salem State University
About My Research: We conduct research on how rejection affects thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. We also examine how beliefs about God impact moral behaviors. Our lab is also investigating how attributing positive events to God affect the self. Finally, we are creating a scale to measure considerateness. I have mentored paid undergraduates over the summer at Winston-Salem State in the past (in addition to the 4-6 research assistants during the school year). I'm looking forward to expanding my mentorship to students outside of our university. I am also enthusiastic about giving back to SPSP!
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Sally Farley, University of Baltimore
About My Research: My research interests generally lie at the intersection of nonverbal communication and relationship science. I am interested in nonverbal behaviors that both facilitate and maintain relational intimacy and attraction (vocal cues, mimicry, laughter). My recent projects have investigated gossip as a social bonding mechanism, social ostracism, and vocal gaydar. I am deeply invested in undergraduate student research mentorship. My research lab is dominated by undergraduate students, several of whom are co-authors on my current and previous manuscripts, paper presentations, and poster presentations. I am excited about this opportunity!
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Jennifer Fugate, University of MA – Dartmouth
About My Research: Here at the SOCOlab we study emotion categories. My research projects fall under four major questions: 1) How do emotion words affect emotion perception? 2) How do words create discrete emotion categories ? 3) Is there universality of emotion categories? 4) How does learning emotion words increase emotional intelligence? https://fugatejennifer.wordpress.com/ The SOCOlab (Social Cognition on the South Coast) is located on the beautiful south coast of MA at the University of MA- Dartmouth, 20 miles from Cape Code and 5 miles from some of the most beautiful beaches in the Northeast. The University affords all the opportunities of a large, research university with a more home-town feel. The University is 35 miles from Providence, RI and 60 miles from Boston, MA.
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Shelly Gable, University of California, Santa Barbara
About My Research: We conduct research on the role of motivation and emotion in close relationships. We look at how approach and avoidance goals simultaneously influence close relationship processes and outcomes. We also examine social emotion regulation and how others play a role in coping (or not) with negative and positive events. Santa Barbara is a lovely place to visit and UCSB has wonderful cohort of social psychology faculty and graduate students.
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Amber M. Gaffney, Humboldt State University
About My Research: My research focuses on social identity, group processes and social influence. A large part of my work examines how prototypical and non-prototypical group members can create and manage uncertainty to enact social change. I would be excited to invite curious students to bring innovative ideas to my lab and research. My lab has graduate and undergraduate students who all share a passion for research. We value new opinions and perspectives, which will will add to the strength and creativity of ideas that we produce. We have several on-going projects that focus on how political leaders and social groups use uncertainty as a tool for influence.
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Sarah Gaither, Duke University
About My Research: Broadly, I study how social identities and experiences motivate social behavior in diverse settings. Specifically, how contact with diverse others shapes social interactions, how having multiple racial or multiple social identities affects behavior and categorization, and what contexts shape the development 
Additional Information: For more information about my research: https://sites.duke.edu/dukeidlab/
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Wendi Gardner, Northwestern University
About My Research: We focus on self/identity as well as belonging and exclusion. A SPUR undergraduate would be involved in studies involving how individuals and/or couples form and maintain positive identities in the face of social stressors.   Tasks would likely include interviews, running experiments, and video or text data coding and analysis.
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Jessica Good, Davidson College
About My Research: Currently we are pursuing NSF-funded research on the influence of instructors' diversity philosophies on the performance of women and underrepresented minority students in STEM classes. Our other major line of research is understanding what motivates people to confront discrimination and how people respond when they are confronted.
Additional Information: I have a year-round, full-time lab manager as well as a handful of undergraduate research students each semester and over the summer. Lab information can be found here: http://jessicajgood.com
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Kurt Gray, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
About My Research: You have a mind, but what about a cow or a computer? Can they think and feel like you? This is important because entities with minds are afforded moral status. We study how people see the minds of others, and how this "mind perception" underlies our most crucial moral judgments.
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Igor Grossmann, University of Waterloo
About My Research: The Wisdom and Culture lab focuses on factors that enable people to think and act wisely situating them in a larger cultural context: How can individuals and groups resolve social conflicts? What factors foster wise reasoning and adaptive emotion regulation? What are physiological and cultural fundamentals of a wise judgment?
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Nao Hagiwara, Virginia Commonwealth University
About My Research: I investigate the underlying mechanisms involved in stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination by utilizing both traditional social psychological and social cognitive research methods. I also examine how these processes contribute to social injustice (e.g., health disparities, educational disparities) in applied settings.
Additional Information: Although my primary affiliation is with the Health Psychology Program, I was trained as a basic experimental social psychologist (and I teach both undergraduate and graduate Social Psychology courses every year). My Discrimination and Health Lab (http://www.psychology.vcu.edu/people/faculty/hagiwara.html) is very active with three graduate students and 15 undergraduate research interns. Currently, we are working on four projects, of which one of them are funded by NIH and two of them are funded by NSF.
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Gabriella Harari, Stanford University
About My Research: My research examines how personality is expressed in physical and digital contexts in everyday life. Using methods from psychology and computer science, my lab examines what digital media technologies, and smartphones in particular, reveal about people’s behavioral patterns and psychological states.
Additional Information: I am involved with diversity-related initiatives for students from under-represented groups, primarily via mentorship and departmental service. As an undergraduate student, I was a McNair Scholar and UC Berkeley SROP Fellow. As a graduate student, I was a representative for the Graduate Student Diversity Committee in the Psychology Department at UT Austin. My mentoring style is informed by my own experiences with programs designed to prepare undergraduate students for graduate school.
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Larisa Heiphetz, Columbia University
About My Research: Our lab studies moral psychology. We are especially interested in the contexts of religion (e.g., how children and adults think about moral characteristics of religious in-group vs. out-group members) and criminal justice (e.g., how people -- including children of incarcerated parents -- respond to incarcerated individuals).
Additional Information: Please feel free to take a look at our lab website for more information about current research projects: columbiasamclab.weebly.com
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Erin Hennes, Purdue University
About My Research: The Social Cognition of Social Justice laboratory focuses on cognitive and motivational biases in information processing, particularly in the context of contemporary issues such as environmental sustainability and racial and gender inequality.
Additional Information: Research tasks will be commensurate with experience and ability. New students in the lab will primarily collect or code data and conduct literature reviews. Additional responsibilities, such as data cleaning, data analysis, stimulus design, and programming will be available for advanced students. Students will receive mentorship in pursuing their own career goals, as well as have the opportunity to receive additional training on topics such as data analysis, study design, and presentational skills.
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Hal Hershfield, UCLA Anderson School of Management
About My Research: Broadly, I’m interested in how individuals perceive the passage of time and how such perceptions influence decision-making and consumer behavior. I focus on the connections that people feel between their current selves and their future selves, and how research can enhance those connections.
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Edward Hirt, Indiana University
About My Research: My research generally concentrates on issues related to motivation and performance. My primary current line of research focuses on mental depletion and its consequences for subsequent performance and acts of self-control. We also have work investigating self-handicapping, exploring the tradeoffs inherent in protecting self-esteem in threatening performance contexts.
Additional Information: Our lab is a highly collegial and colloborative environment which values the input of all members. The goal is to make this experience the most productive and beneficial for you personally in your growth as a social psychology researcher.
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Simon Howard, Marquette University
About My Research: Dr. Howard uses experimental methods drawn from cognitive, perceptual, and social investigations to explore the ways race influences—often negatively—our social perception, judgment, interactions, and memory in variety of domains (.e.g., law, education, media, clinical/patient outcomes).
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Derek Isaacowitz, Northeastern University
About My Research: My lab uses a variety of methods (including mobile eye tracking, stationary eye tracking, and psychophysiology) to investigate adult age differences in emotion regulation and social perception. We tend to have a pretty large group of students in the lab each summer.
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Rachael Jack, Institution of Neuroscience & Psychology, University of Glasgow, UK
About My Research: My research focuses on understanding social communication – that is, how signals such as facial expressions are transmitted and decoded – to support  social interaction within and across cultures. I then transfer this knowledge to inform the design of social robots. I use an interdisciplinary approach combining social psychology, psychophysics, and information theory. Work published in Ann. Rev. Psychol., PNAS, Current Biology, JEP:Gen, Psychological Science.
Additional Information: MATLAB programming is an essential skill to work in my lab, so opportunities would be provided to learn this, plus a range of multivariate techniques that are typically used to analyse high dimensional data such as dynamic facial expressions and 3D face morphology and complexion. I also have a state-of-the-art face capture system (www.di4d.com) that students would gain hands on experience with.
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Jeremy Jamieson, University of Rochester
About My Research: We routinely navigate a world that is teeming with stressful social situations, such as job interviews, performance reviews, debates with friends and family, or asking someone out on a date. To better understand how social stress impacts our lives, my research examines the psychological and biological forces that impact decisions, emotions, and performance. On-going projects in the lab research affective dynamics processes, effects of stress reappraisal interventions, and how competition and inequality impact biological functioning. 
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Lisa Jaremka, University of Delaware
About My Research: I utilize a social psychological approach to understand the effects of social disconnection on motivation, physiology, and health. My expertise lies at the interface between physiology and psychology with a specialization in psychoneuroimmunology and psychoneuroendocrinology.
Additional Information: Students in my lab would learn a wide array of tasks, ranging from running participants, to cleaning data, to developing and perfecting study procedures.
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Peter Jonason, Western Sydney University
About My Research: My work examines personality (e.g., Dark Triad traits) and interpersonal relationships from an evolutionary perspective (see www.peterjonason.com). During this internship you might work on projects attempting to answer some fundamental questions like “what are personality traits really measuring” and “what are the psychological mechanisms behind mate choice”.
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Cheryl Kaiser, University of Washington
About My Research: Our laboratory explores the intersection of self and social identity, particularly when the worth of one’s social identity (e.g., race, gender) is called into question by stereotypes/discrimination. This research develops theoretical perspectives on social stigma, legitimacy, identity, and diversity, and connects social psychology with law, political science, and sociology.
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Lucas Keefer, University of Southern Mississippi
About My Research: My research primarily explores the role of conceptual metaphor as a means of understanding abstract features of the social world, such as political issues and the mental lives of other people. This research draws upon an interdisciplinary perspective bridging psychology, philosophy, and linguistics.
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Laura King, University of Missouri, Columbia
About My Research: I am a personality/social psychologist who spends her time thinking about what it is that makes life meaningful. We have conducted (and continue to conduct) experiments and correlational studies aimed at identifying what people mean when they say their lives are meaningful.
Additional Information: Typically in the summer we have a fairly active lab with a couple of graduate students and undergraduates meeting and running studies. It's a lot of fun.
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Sara Konrath,  Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis
About My Research: In the Interdisciplinary Program of Empathy and Altruism Research (www.ipearlab.org), we examine motivations, traits, and behaviors relevant to helping, charitable giving, volunteering, and other prosocial acts. Current projects involve empathy-building mobile phone interventions, examining narcissism and prosocial behavior, and conducting meta-analyses related to empathy. The SPUR student will be involved in this and other projects. We are a friendly and cooperative group that includes a professor, graduate students, and undergraduates. We value mentoring and take a growth-oriented approach to learning. We work closely with our students to better understand their goals and to make working in the lab a beneficial and enjoyable experience for them. We are especially mindful of the need for professionalization and CV development opportunities. Indianapolis is a great place to live with many cultural and recreational activities.
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Kevin Ladd, Indiana University South Bend
About My Research: Primary focus is on religion and spirituality: prayer practices, ritual as performance, embodiment of spiritual experience (prayer postures; walking labyrinths). Our methods and tools range from eye tracking (SR Research Eye Link 2000) experiments to making movies based on qualitative interviews (Las Vegas buskers reflecting on spirituality in the workplace).
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Veronica Lamarche, University of Essex
About My Research: My research focuses on understanding how people regulate trust and dependence in their romantic relationships, and how feelings of uncertainty or vulnerability can influence relationship stability. I would love for the opportunity to work with interested students! More information about ongoing research projects can be found on my website: http://www.veronicalamarche.com/research/.
Additional Information: The Social and Health Psychology Research Group, in the Department of Psychology at the University of Essex, consists of a dynamic group of international researchers, with diverse backgrounds and complementary interests.
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Bernhard Leidner, University of Massachusetts
About My Research: I am a social and political psychologist in the Psychology of Peace and Violence Program in the Department of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. My research, funded by NSF and others, focuses on intergroup violence, international conflict (reduction) and justice, primarily at the international level (e.g. Israel/Palestine, Balkans).
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Dana Leighton, Texas A&M University—Texarkana
About My Research: The Peace and Justice Psychology Lab works on intergroup relations, specifically stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. We study the antecedents, processes, and outcomes of peace & justice. We're currently running studies on racial bias in jury selection, sexual harassment over social media, exclusion of immigrants from justice, and mental illness stigma.
Additional Information: Texas A&M University—Texarkana is part of the Texas A&M University system, and enjoys many of the research resources available to a large university system, but is a small campus with a friendly atmosphere located in East Texas. Texarkana is home to the Perot Theater, host to local, national, and international performing arts including the Texarkana Symphony. Comfortable and safe on-campus housing is available for the SPUR student, and off-campus apartments are plentiful.
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Christopher Leone, University of North Florida
About My Research: My program of research involves the role of (a) individual differences (e.g., need for cognition) in persuasion (e.g., self-generated attitude change), (b) individual differences (e.g., self-monitoring) in close relationships (e.g., dating), and (c) individual differences (e.g., religiosity) in prejudice (e.g., discrimination against gays and lesbians).
Additional Information: My research team is comprised of both undergraduate and graduate students. Experienced members of my team serve as peer mentors for less experienced members, and I of course act as a mentor for all of my proteges. In so doing, I have worked with many students from underrepresented ethnic groups who have gone to be successful at the doctoral level. Indeed, virtually all of the undergraduates I have mentored have gone on to doctoral programs including University of Michigan, University of Texas, and Indiana University to name a few. I have one several awards for mentoring from both my home institution as well as professional organisations (e.g., Southeastern Psychological Association). I have also given numerous presentations at meetings of professional organisations on the subject of mentoring.
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Kristen Lindquist, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
About My Research: My lab studies the cognitive and neural mechanisms that generate healthy emotions. To do so, we use a broad set of methods including social cognitive methods, peripheral psychophysiology, neuroimaging, and lesion studies. During Summer 2018, we will be conducting studies investigating age-related changes in the embodiment of emotion. Up to three students would be welcome for mentorship. Students may be trained as experimenters to help with data collection including how to collect peripheral psychophysiology measures (EKG, cardiac impedance, blood pressure), administer emotion inductions (e.g., the Trier Social Stress task), measure reaction times and interoceptive accuracy, and to work with several experimental packages such as Matlab, Eprime, and Qualtrics. Students may also gain experience in neuroimaging data analyses. Interested students can visit our lab website at: www.unc.edu/~kal29/index.html
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Debbie Ma, California State University Northridge
About My Research: My research focuses on stereotyping and prejudice, face perception, and social cognition. I have investigated phenomena like racial bias in the decision to shoot and ascriptions of national identity to non-Whites. We are currently studying face perception as it relates to face, such as the cross race effect.
Additional Information: Over the summer my lab has biweekly meetings. We have a lot of research projects in different stages of development. I think this would allow a student to gain exposure to many areas of research and learn about the research process. Further, my institution is classified as an undergraduate-serving institution, which makes it a welcoming environment for undergraduate researchers.
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Christine Ma-Kellams, University of La Verne
About My Research: My work focuses on cultural social psychology and the role of group membership in dictating outcomes related to emotion and judgment/decision-making. Current projects include: examining class/SES and age as forms of "culture" and testing the situational contexts that make individuals better or worse at reading others.
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Cara MacInnis, University of Calgary
About My Research: I am interested in the way humans interact with one another in our diverse world, focusing on barriers to positive intergroup relations. I study perceptions, behaviors, emotions, and socio-political orientations that serve as barriers to positive intergroup relations and means to overcome barriers to positive intergroup relations and reduce prejudice.
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Keith Maddox, Tufts University
About My Research: My lab is focused on research programs examining social cognitive aspects of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Topics include racial phenotypicality bias, confronting biased attitudes and behavior, developing strategies to encourage and empower interracial interactions, and applied diversity science. ase.tufts.edu/psychology/people/maddox/
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Wendy Berry Mendes, UC San Francisco
About My Research: The work in my lab focuses on emotion, intergroup interactions, and biological psychology. Two general themes guide our research: (a) intergroup relations and stigmatization, and (b) effects of emotion on cognitive processing, behavior, and physiology. We use a multi-method approach including physiological responses, non-verbal, cognitive performance, and subjective states. For the past 11 years my lab has held a summer internship program that invites between 10 and 15 undergraduates for an intensive 8-week summer program. The internship program consists of weekly tutorials, training in psychophysiology, and executing studies. The internships ends with a formal presentation from each intern on a proposed research project where they receive both verbal and written evaluations from. This internship is ideal for undergraduates seeking either admissions into psychology graduate programs or medical school.
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Monica Miller, University of Nevada, Reno
About My Research: I have a PhD in social psychology; my area is legal psychology. My main interests are in legal decision-making and attitudes. I study how jurors' decisions (and people's support for laws more broadly) are affected by social-cognitive biases, attributions, group processes, prejudice, and individual differences. My CV is available: http://www.unr.edu/criminal-justice/people/monica-miller
Additional Information: I currently work with 8 graduate students who the student could also choose to work with, so there are plenty of different projects going on in our lab at all times.
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Marina Milyavskaya, Carleton University
About My Research: The lab's research examines contextual and personality influences on the setting, pursuit, and accomplishment of short and long-term goals, as well as the ramifications of goal pursuit on health and well-being. We use multiple methodologies (experiments, reaction times, prospective studies, experience sampling) to triangulate answers to questions of interest.
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Damian Murray, Tulane University
About My Research: The effects of environmental threats for social attitudes and behavior; contextual predictors of moral and political attitudes; predictors of formation and satisfaction in close (romantic) relationships.
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Matt Motyl, University of Illinois at Chicago
About My Research: I study social ecology, ideology, intergroup conflict, and morality. My lab uses diverse methods ranging from social interaction studies in-lab to Big Data studies of social media behaviors.
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Keely Muscatell, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
About My Research: Research in the Social Neuroscience and Health Lab at UNC Chapel Hill focuses on understanding how social experiences (e.g., stress, social status, inequality, discrimination, loneliness, social support) influence physical health and emotional well-being, incorporating techniques from social neuroscience and psychoneuroimmunology to identify pathways linking the social environment and health outcomes.
Additional Information: You can find more information about our lab and the work we do at our lab website, http://carolinasnhlab.com/overview/.
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Jean Natividade, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro
About My Research: I am currently developing research about love relationships and personality. I am interested in verifying how sexual characteristics affect the choice and retention of partners. Our studies include experiments on attractiveness in which we manipulate the expression of personality traits, correlational studies on relationship satisfaction, and use of implicit measures.
Additional Information: For more information, please, see our Lab website: www.L2PS.org
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Yolanda NiemannUniversity of North Texas
About My Research: My research focuses on the social ecological contexts of tokenism, stereotypes, and microaggressions in academia. I am also conducting research on mentorship of graduate and postgraduate students.
Additional Information: The link to my faculty page is http://psychology.unt.edu/faculty/yolanda-flores-niemann.
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Jessica Nolan, University of Scranton
About My Research: My research focuses on the application of psychology to understand and solve social problems. One line of research looks at how and when people are willing to impose social sanctions on environmental transgressors. The other line of research looks at how individuals react to feedback indicating that they are prejudiced.
Additional Information: Students in my research lab will be involved with all aspects of research design and data analysis. In addition, students will be exposed to laboratory, on-line, and field-based research protocols. The University of Scranton is a private, liberal arts University, with a lovely campus located in walking distance of downtown Scranton, PA.
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Kymberlee M. O’Brien, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
About My Research: My research uses physiological indices to examine stress related social psychological topics, including microaggressions, intergroup processes, discrimination, and social evaluative stress. We also examine the more positive social influences on health and physiology including empathy, social belonging, and mindfulness. More recently, we are beginning psychophysiological studies involving social robotics which asks questions about how we perceive humanness in others or objects. My lab is the Social, Health, and Psychophysiology (SHP) Lab at WPI.
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Kristina Olson, University of Washington
About My Research: At the moment, our lab is primarily focused on research on gender identity in gender diverse populations. We are studying what the development of transgender youth looks like, the impact of social support on the well-being of transgender and gender nonconforming people, and what underlies prejudice against transgender people. Throughout the summer we organize several professional development talks (e.g., how do you apply to grad school?, what can you do with a Ph.D?) and social events and would love for a SPUR student to join us in these activities.
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Christopher Oveis, UC San Diego
About My Research: I study how emotions influence social interactions by gathering rich measures of emotion across multiple response channels, including autonomic physiology and nonverbal behavior.
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John Pachankis, Yale University
About My Research: We study LGBT mental health. Our experimental and epidemiological research specifically seeks to identify factors that might explain LGBT individuals’ disproportionate experiences with several adverse mental health outcomes. We are a team of social and clinical psychologists who aim to translate our research into treatments for the LGBT community.
Additional Information: More information about our research can be found at: esteem.yale.edu
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Sylvia Perry, Northwestern University
About My Research: We are investigating research questions at the intersection of social cognition and intergroup relations. These include: What are the interpersonal and intergroup consequences of racial bias awareness? How do people perceive those who admit their bias? What are the predictors of White parents’ willingness to discuss race with their children?
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Cynthia Pickett, University of California, Davis
About My Research: I conduct research within the areas of social identity, intergroup relations, the self, social cognition, and social rejection. Current projects include studies examining group identity conflict, collective pride, self-stereotyping in the context of interracial interactions, and barriers to social inclusion.
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Angela Pirlott, Saint Xavier University
About My Research: My research seeks to understand prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination--particularly sexual orientation prejudice--from an affordance management perspective, which suggests that prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination evolved as functional responses to perceived threats and opportunities posed by other groups--stereotypes reflect perceived threats which engage specific emotions and behaviors to mitigate such threats. Saint Xavier University is located in Chicago, IL, which would allow for great extracurricular experiences as well. 
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Kimberly Quinn, DePaul University
About My Research: My current research takes a social-cognitive approach to studying how individuals’ representations of themselves and others shape and are shaped by interaction, and in what happens when the “other” includes the physical spaces that the individual inhabits. Our primary focus right now is the self-transcendent emotion of awe in a variety of public spaces, in collaboration with the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, the Lincoln Park Zoo, and the John G. Shedd Aquarium, and with potential future involvement of several other local museums.
Additional Information: Students interested in our research would have the opportunity to learn interesting methods such as eye tracking, and would work with both me and my primary collaborator at DePaul (Sheila Krogh-Jespersen). Interested students can't be afraid of new technology or self-directed learning, because we're learning new techniques all the time in my lab and so we're often also in the learning stage!
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Jessica Remedios, Tufts University
About My Research: I study stigma, identity, and intersectionality using experimental methods.
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Lindsey Rodriguez, University of South Florida - St. Petersburg
About My Research: My research incorporates social cognitive and relationship theories with health psychology to focus on understanding and improving relationships, including how relationships are influenced by alcohol/other addictive behaviors, intimate partner violence, jealousy, and interpersonal perceptions. The ultimate goal is to design empirically-based interventions to help individuals struggling with relationship-related stressors. In addition to first-hand exposure to the entire research design and analysis process, professional development activities will be incorporated into the summer experience. Students will design and receive tailored feedback on developing a curriculum vitae, as well as engage in active discussion about the graduate school application process (e.g., how to search for programs and advisors, determine fit in research interests, pre-application advisor contact, personal statement development) as well as broader career development (e.g., internship and non-academic career opportunities).
Additional Information: I consider mentoring high-quality undergraduates and helping them accomplish their goals (e.g., finding a program that excites them, helping them get into graduate school) a very high priority. For more information on my lab, please visit my website at www.USFSP.edu/heart.
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Nick Rule, University of Toronto
About My Research: I study social perception and cognition, focusing on the accuracy/reliability of our perceptions of others as well as the consequences that result from perceiving individuals (e.g., prejudice, discrimination, and augmented cognitive processes). My research is multi-method, spanning nation-level differences (cultural psychology) and neural differences (social neuroscience).
Additional Information: Toronto is a great place to visit in the summer. The University of Toronto has a very vibrant and collegial group of social and personality psychologists.
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Brian Sanchez, UC Riverside
About My Research: My research interest revolves around resilience (or ability to cope with adversity) and the academic performance of minority students. I want to examine types of resilience strategies that students from different ethnic groups use to help them excel in a demanding academic environment.
Additional Information: I have experience training undergraduate research assistants in previous labs, and this should be a good experience for students, as I am currently in the process of collecting data for my project.
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Joni Sasaki, University of Hawaii
About My Research: I conduct basic psychological research on the effects of culture and religion on social cognition, relationships, health, and emotion.
Additional Information: Please see my lab website to see more about my research: http://cultureandreligionlab.weebly.com/
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Donald Saucier, Kansas State University
About My Research: My research interests center on expressions of antisocial and prosocial behavior. Specifically, I am interested in the individual differences and situational factors that contribute to the justification and suppression of antisocial behavior (e.g., prejudice, aggression), as well as to decisions to behave prosocially (e.g., to give or withhold help).
Additional Information: I have an active and productive research lab that prioritizes the professional development of undergraduate and graduate students.
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Benjamin Saunders, Long Island University - Brooklyn
About My Research: The Politics, Race, and Ideology (PRIDE) group at LIU – Brooklyn examines the impact of system-justifying ideologies (i.e., beliefs about the proper order of society that legitimize the status quo) on racial attitudes and racial policy preferences.
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Toni Schmader, UBC
About My Research: My research examines how stereotypes and bias constrain people’s performance and self-views. Research interests include self and social identity, stereotyping and prejudice, coping with social stigma, emotion and motivation, social cognition. Current research focuses on women’s experience of social identity threat in STEM fields and ways to mitigate those effects.
Additional Information: Here is the link to my lab's website: http://socialidentitylab.psych.ubc.ca/ Here is link to the ESS website, a research consortium that I am director of: http://successinstem.ca/ Here is a link to an article about the Social Identity Lab: http://psych.ubc.ca/march-lab-of-the-month-ubcs-social-identity-lab-is-b...
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Juliana Schroeder, UC Berkeley
About My Research: Juliana Schroeder conducts research on the experimental study of social cognition. Her research explores primarily two aspects of how people navigate their social worlds: first, how people form inferences about others' mental states and mental capacities and second, how these inferences influence their interactions. For more information, please see: www.julianaschroeder.com
Additional Information: I'm happy to mentor more than one student.
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Marlene Schwartz, University of Connecticut
About My Research: I direct the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity (www.uconnruddcenter.org). Our mission is to promote solutions to childhood obesity, poor diet, and weight bias through research and policy. We study weight stigma, government and charitable food assistance, schools and child care wellness policies, and food marketing to youth.
Additional Information: We are located in Hartford, CT.
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Amanda Sesko, University of Alaska Southeast
About My Research: I focus on the relative invisibility of American Indians/Alaska Natives that occurs when a group representation is outdated and/or erroneous, or misperceived to be outdated. Specifically, I examine how “historical” representations within cultural tourism affect behavioral attributes (e.g., engagement in intelligent and contemporary behaviors) and stereotypes of indigenous groups.
Additional Information: We are currently conducting studies on the topic listed over the summer using tourists that come to Juneau as participants. The research assistant would primarily be involved in this work and thus would be getting a unique experience collecting data from a community-based sample outside of the lab. Juneau offers a rich and unique environment to study social psychological issues. In addition, it is a beautiful place to visit with many opportunities for exploration! See http://www.uas.alaska.edu/dir/aksesko.html for more information on my research.
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Sawa Senzaki, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
About My Research: At the Culture and Development Lab, we study how culturally unique perspectives develop by focusing on parent-child interaction. We currently work with toddlers (3-6 years) to examine cross-cultural differences in cognitive and social development. Topics include holistic-analytic attention, dialectical self, executive functions, social evaluation, and affective-social neuroscience (EEG).
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Jeffrey Sherman, University of California, Davis
About My Research: My research investigates the cognitive processes underlying social psychology and behavior. In particular, I am interested in how stereotypes and prejudice affect how people perceive themselves, other people, and groups of people.
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Donna Shestowsky, UC Davis School of Law
About My Research: My main objective is to examine assumptions underlying the structure of the legal system and to explore ways in which the system might be improved using psychological research. I am the sole PI of a project which examines how litigants evaluate legal procedures, funded by the NSF and ABA.
Additional Information: I have a law degree and a PhD in Psychology. I normally work with 3-5 law students and one grad student in Psychology at UC Davis. Here is more info: https://law.ucdavis.edu/faculty/shestowsky/ My research this coming year will focus on analyzing my data which compares litigants' perceptions of procedures at the start of their cases with their perceptions at the end of their cases. I plan to teach students to code responses to open-ended questions and have them help me with putting together tables for publications and powerpoint presentations. They will learn about applied research in the area of social psychology.
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Natalie Shook, West Virginia University
About My Research: The goal of my research is to understand the cognitive and affective processes underlying attitude formation and change, as well as how attitudes guide behavior. To do this, I examine attitudes across a variety of domains from emotional disorders to politics to prejudicial attitudes, and use a variety of methodologies.
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H. Colleen Sinclair, Mississippi State University
About My Research: I conduct research on the formation, maintenance, and deterioration of interpersonal relationships, broadly construed.  Foci include: testing social network effects on romantic relationships, examining consequences of social rejection for anti-social vs. pro-social behavior, improving intergroup relations, & studying cross-group relationships (cross-gender friendships, inter-ethnic/inter-faith romantic relationships).
Additional Information: I direct state-of-the-art lab - the Social Relations Collaborative (www.socialrelationslab.com) - at the Social Science Research Center at Mississippi State University. We have been funded by Mississippi State's Office of Research, the Center for Open Science, Psi Chi, the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, and the Association of Psychological Science, and are in the middle of completing $1.6 million from the National Institute of Justice to undertake a three-year endeavor to examine when rejection leads to aggression in high schools.  We have a large productive lab through which doors approximately 200 undergraduate research assistants have passed and gone onto great things (and 26 graduate students).  We changed the name of the lab to the "Collaborative" to emphasize our commitment to mentorship, cooperation, and growing scholarly relationships.  We would be happy to host students over the summer as we continue to grow.
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Samuel Sommers, Tufts University
About My Research: Experimental research regarding social perception, judgment, behavior, and memory in diverse settings. Much of this work examines how people communicate, think, and interact in interracial contexts, and is motivated by the desire to advance social psychological theory, but also to conduct research with practical implications.
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Stephanie Spielmann, Wayne State University
About My Research: Research conducted in the Relationships and Individual Differences lab aims to better understand how insecurities affect feelings and behaviors within romantic relationships. Much of our research focuses on better understanding pining for ex-partners following a breakup, as well as better understanding the effects of the fear of being single.
Additional Information: The city of Detroit is a great place to visit! The area around campus has many new restaurants and bars, and there is plenty to do from sporting events to the arts.
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Janina Steinmetz, Utrecht University
About My Research: My research investigates how people pursue their goals with others. For example, when others observe them, people think their actions are bigger (Steinmetz et al., 2016, JPSP). How do other people affect people's thoughts and actions more generally, and is self-regulation different in the company of others versus alone?
Additional Information: Utrecht University offers a large and active social psychology research environment. The university has been ranked among Europe's top university due to its great research environment. The campus is close to the historic, vibrant old town of Utrecht, about 30 minutes from Amsterdam.
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Chadly Stern, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
About My Research: My research examines how political ideology shapes people's perceptions of the world (e.g., categorizing others into groups), and how these perceptions impact large-scale outcomes (e.g., inequality). My research also addresses questions related to stereotyping and prejudice, with a strong focus on topics concerning race, gender, and the LGBT community.
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Margaret Stevenson, University of Evansville
About My Research: My research interests focus on the intersection of children, psychology, and the law. Specifically, I study perceptions of children who enter the legal system, either as victims of crime or perpetrators of crime. For instance, I have explored factors (race, abuse history) that shape support for adolescent sex offender registration. I also explore factors that shape jury decision-making, broadly.
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John Tawa, Mount Holyoke College
About My Research: I am interested in the psychology of race-relations.  As an example, some of my past research has examined how perceived competition for resources (e.g., educational, economic) creates greater distance between minority groups (e.g., between Blacks and Asians) relative to both their distances towards the White majority group. While the content of my research focuses on intergroup relations, methodologically I am particularly interested in directly assessing people's "real time" behavior, in lieu of a primary reliance on self-reported behavior.  I find that virtual technology is a particularly powerful medium for assessing intergroup behavior.  For example, in the study described above, I had participants create self-resembling avatars and interact in social events in the virtual world Second Life.  When I introduced a resource competition task in the social event, Black and Asian participants were found to increase their collective physical distance towards each other.  Currently, I am developing a project that uses virtual reality to examine racial bias in police decisions to use lethal force.  Prospective mentees interested in working with me can find out more information on my website (www.thebiaslab.com) and/or contact me directly (jtawa@mtholyoke.edu).  
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Jo-Ann Tsang, Baylor University
About My Research: What are the benefits and limitations of forgiveness and gratitude, and how is religiousness related to these “virtues”? Are there circumstances under which a concept like gratitude might have negative consequences? My laboratory conducts research on religiousness, forgiveness, gratitude, and the psychology of morality. Students from the SPUR program will work closely with a graduate student and myself on a number of ongoing studies in these areas. Students will assist in research design, data collection, and data analyses.
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Jay Van Bavel, New York University
About My Research: Human beings are social animals adapted for group living. Our research examines how collective concerns—ranging from our group identities to our moral values and political ideologies—can shape even the most basic elements of perception and evaluation. We believe these social dynamics are fundamental to understanding the human mind and brain. Our lab takes a social neuroscience approach to these issues, moving from the function of brain regions to large-scale collective action. It is our hope that this approach will help address a range of social issues, including implicit bias, dehumanization, cooperation, justice, partisanship, and intergroup conflict.
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Greg Walton, Stanford University
About My Research: We examine social-psychological processes that contribute to diverse social problems, and how "wise interventions" can address these problems. For instance, brief interventions to bolster students sense of belonging in the transition to college can reduce achievement gaps at institutional scale (http://collegetransitioncollaborative.org/)For more, see http://gregorywalton-stanford.weebly.com/
Additional Information: More information regarding the CTC can be found at collegetransitioncollaborative.org Feel free to contact Ali Blodorn, the CTC’s Senior Research manager, with any questions (ablodorn@stanford.edu)
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Christian Waugh, Wake Forest University
About My Research: I investigate how people adapt successfully to stress through the flexible use of regulatory strategies. Specifically I focus on the use of positive emotions to adapt to stress and the temporal dynamics of emotional experiences. Methodologically, I investigate these topics using surveys, behavioral and physiological experiments, and functional neuroimaging. We have been very successful in mentoring summer research students in our lab over the years. There may also be opportunities to collaborate with other labs at Wake as well as with labs at Winston Salem State University.
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Oliver Wilhelm, Ulm University
About My Research: Our lab focuses on:
*Construction and evaluation of achievement, ability, and aptitude tests
*Innovative measures for student achievement
*Structure and validity of individual differences in cognitive abilities
*Multivariate methods in general, and measurement & scaling in particular
*Ability related personality constructs
*Socio-emotional abilities like emotion perception, emotion expression, personality faking
Additional Information: While the department is based in Germany, everyone is also fluent in English, so students can work in German or English.
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Anne Wilson, Wilfrid Laurier University
About My Research: My lab members and I investigate questions related to identity (personal, relational, and collective) over time (i.e., constructions of the past and future), lay theories, and how motivation and beliefs shape well-being, subjective perception, interpersonal and intergroup processes, and goal pursuit. Please see my website for more information: https://www.annewilsonpsychlab.com/
Additional Information: I am also a member of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), Successful Societies Program, committed to understanding the antecedents and consequences of social inequality and the processes that reproduce inequality across time.
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Thiyagarajan Yuvaraj, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli, India
About My Research: I am doing my research on understanding the personality antecedents of internet overuse and the health consequences among the net geners in India.
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Jamil Zaki, Stanford University
About My Research: ​​Researchers at the Stanford Social Neuroscience Lab study social interaction and emotion, with a special emphasis on empathy, prosocial behaviors, and social influence. We use a variety of techniques spanning neuroimaging, psychophysiology, behavioral methods, and social network analysis. We're always looking for talented and enthusiastic researchers; join us!
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Michael Zarate, UT El Paso
About My Research: ​​We study how memory consolidation processes influence social perception. We test how experiences need time to be consolidated with existing memory structures for them to be acted upon in an implicit fashion. We are also testing cultural inertia concepts regarding how a fear of change influences attitudes towards other groups.
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Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Oakland University
About My Research: My primary research interests are in three interrelated areas: (1) dark personality features (e.g., narcissism, psychopathy, Machiavellianism, spitefulness), (2) self-esteem, and (3) interpersonal relationships. Though divergent at times, these substantive areas often overlap in my research so that much of my work reflects an integration of these topics.
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